Archive | January 2013

Our number one priority?

When I think about priority lists, I am astounded at how often others and myself reflexively place our relationship with God at the top of that list. A running thought to illustrate this idea is the idea of tithing, but from the perspective of time. In other words, what if instead of tithing with your income, you tithe 10% of your day to growing your relationship with God. This works out to 2.4 hours per day. To be sure, I haven’t read any evidence of this idea in the Bible but it is certainly humbling to consider how many of us find it hard to imagine carving out 2.4 hours of your day to growing your relationship with God.

For me, the larger issue is not how much we think we should work on our relationship with God but rather, what is it about the relationship that we already have with God that encourages us to grow the relationship. Short of a real relationship, God will just be on a list and not in your heart. To that end, one of the most convicting questions you can ask someone who calls themselves Christian is how do they personally know that God is real. One on hand, you might hear the accurate, yet surface answer that God woke me up this morning or that God created the whole world. On the other hand, you may hear that someone’s disease was cured when doctors said it wasn’t possible or that a person was saved from their drug addiction by the power of God. The problem though is that both types of answers are easy to dismiss. The “God woke me up” answers sound trite and rehearsed, despite their being true while the deep, moving stories do not seem real if you can’t relate to that predicament.

So again, how do you know that God lives in your heart? What have you experienced in life that makes you feel horrible for not nurturing your relationship with God? Just like in any relationships, the perceived benefits based off past performance will determine how much you are willing to put forth to make that relationship work. God’s past performance is easy to take for granted because generally speaking, when you go to sleep, you expect to wake up. It’s also easy to take for granted when you have not had a severe downturn (financial, health, family, etc.) that caused you to prioritize God if for no other reason that you didn’t have a choice.

Our relationship with God should always be number one on our priority list. However, I just think it’s more realistic to do the things that make God number one as opposed to putting God first on the list on paper before you do the same with your heart. I once heard this quote that said something like, “Why would you treat someone like a priority who treats you like an option?” Selah.

New Pain

What’s up fam,

I have been fascinated recently with the notion of pain, new pain in particular. New pain often comes from changes in our lives in which we may or may not have control. This past year, 2012 was full of new change including moving to Chicago, studying for the bar, getting married, and seeking work.

What inspired today’s post was a conversation I had with one of my high school classmates who played on the football team. (Still wished my mom had let me play, by the way.) During class, this football player got hyped and said, “Man, that hurt so good!” He went on to explain that his exclamation came from the pain his muscles felt from lifting weights. I didn’t fully understand what he meant at the time but later on I understood what he meant but I did understand when I tried a new workout or went back to school, etc.

The reality of new pain is that it is often the barrier that we must surpass in order to reach our goals, be it spiritually, emotionally, or physically. I think what prevents us from growing is that we love old pain. Old pain hurts in ways that are familiar and even if new pain hurts less, it is still unfamiliar. As you think about your life, are you afraid of new pain or inspired by new pain? Most everyone has goals but its enduring new pain that separates goals that are met versus goals that are desired.

I believe that our pain is elongated unnecessarily due to how we ourselves frustrate the grace that God has already provided. Painful or difficult times often inspire prayers that God take away our pain. However, when Paul pleaded that God take away the thorn in his flesh, God replied in II Corinthians 12:8-9, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” Therefore I will boast all the more gladly about my weaknesses, so that Christ’s power may rest on me. God did not take away Paul’s pain so it’s important to focus not on the pain but on the grace that God gives us to endure.

Life has a way of bringing new pain regardless of whether you ask for it but in 2013, let’s all endeavor to seek out new pain, the pain worthy of our goals.

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