Big ups to the Boogie Down Bronx!!!

I may have that saying wrong but I wanted to highlight the work of Marjora Carter and the good people at Sustainable South Bronx. The mission of SSB is to advance Environmental Justice through innovative, economically sustainable projects that are informed by the needs of the community.

I can’t really give justice to summarizing what they do but one of the projects they are working on includes South Bronx Greenway, a “community led plan for a bicycle/pedestrian greenway along the South Bronx waterfront.” The purpose of this is to increase open space and access to the water front. Another innovative project is Green Roofs, which as it sounds is “a layer of soil and foliage on top of a building.” Some of the benefits is temperature reduction, energy conversation, storm water management, and decreased costs due to less maintenance.

This sister has a Masters in Fine Arts. Now you may be thinking, “How does one make the transition from fine arts to environmental justice?” By following your passions and not allowing people to dictate your destiny. I saw this sister doing a special on PBS and she is truly inspiring, a true SuperSpade, and a young pioneer for environmental justice.

Stay up fam,

Categories:
Environmental Justice

Advertisements

Tags: ,

2 responses to “Big ups to the Boogie Down Bronx!!!”

  1. Meela says :

    I appreciate the post on environmental justice. This topic deserves more attention than it is receiving in the media and in everyday/general discussion. I find it to be no coincidence that the most environmentally degraded, health hazardous, and environmentally neglected communities of the world are those that are comprised of indigenous, minority, and underrepresented populations of the world. I am not saying that because these neighborhoods are exposed to the most severe issues related to the environment that this is an intentional racist or targeted attack on these populations, but I will say that due to these environmental justice issues these populations suffer from a variety of health effects and decreased quality of living. Ignoring this fact raises many questions and responsibility for the condition of these communities needs to be addressed. Although some may argue that the environmental quality of a community is largely or solely in part the responsibility of those who inhabit the area, I would beg to differ considering that some of the most vital environmental indicators such as air, water, and hazardous chemicals, undergo a plethora of regulations and sustainability at the state and national level. What is even more distressing is that often times many of the contributors of the environmental problems include outside sources, which makes the community a dumping ground for unhealthy and unwanted activities. I commend Majora Carter, and many like her who are active in the environmental justice struggle, for taking the initiative to address these issues. Unfortunately this is not just an isolated event, and environmental justice issues are an ongoing problem all over the globe. Your race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status should not have a direct correlation with the amount of pollution and hazardous material you are exposed to, but for many this is exactly the case…I’m sorry, but that’s just not fair, and it is far from the principal of justice that so many profess. If you haven’t heard about cases or topics of environmental justice, I strongly suggest you do so. I believe this topic will become increasingly relevant as we continue to experience some of the more dramatic effects of environmental issues (global warming, etc.) and as long as communities continue to stay divided by economic and racial factors.

  2. Brandon Q. says :

    Meela, you don’t leave me any room to comment because I second EVERYTHING that you said. Your post was forthright and highlighted the complexity that this issue requires. Thank you! It seems that you are very well versed on environmental justice issues so let me ask you this, do you think environmental justice issues make more headway in civil rights circles or environmental circles?

    And what are the broader implications of your answer?

    Stay up,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: